Why the search for jobs will only get more frustrating

by | Jul 18, 2017

With rapid advances in Artificial intelligence (AI), concerns about the possibility of machines taking over our jobs and maybe the world has been a lingering issue. However, this is not something we seem to be exactly worried about in this part of the world, at least not yet.

While we may not be seeing many robots manning our office desks in the coming years, we have to face reality; the job tussle between technological solutions and humans is already upon us. With the high rate of unemployment in the country and the increasing number of startups and companies struggling to find their feet; salary for graduates has become unattractive, internships are the new jobs and job security is becoming a thing of the past.

https://twitter.com/TWEETEST_BOI/status/885427201167982594

Is the above tweet for a job or an internship?

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Yet things will only get worse; with every passing day technology will make our lives easier and human efforts will gradually become irrelevant. As technological solutions become more affordable to businesses, even paid internships may begin to seem like a luxury especially for small businesses that have now become a major employer of labour. Afterall, why do you need an accountant, when you can get the job done using an accounting software.

Still, we churn out tertiary institution graduates each year; many unprepared for the happenings in the real world. With an education system that is geared towards issuing certificates for graduates to gain jobs that are fast becoming unavailable, we are likely going to witness a spike in the unemployment rate in the country.

With increasing technology alternatives, we may get to that point where many graduates are no longer able to get low-paying jobs, not to mention regular jobs in a bid to garner skills and experience. How then can they grow into professionals?

In an analysis by PwC, it is estimated that an average of 30% jobs could be at the risk of automation in the US, Britain, Germany and Japan by 2030. If this is happening in advanced countries, what hope is there for jobs?

The world is changing and we cannot afford to keep ignoring this. Now more than ever, we need to redress our education system;  young people need to be trained with skills that can help them stay relevant and help them cope with the changing tide.

Also, people must recognise the need to go the extra mile to get themselves prepped up for the future. If formal education can’t get us where we ought to be then maybe we should start considering our options.

Onyinye Uche
Onyinye Uche

Writer. Interested in EdTech and tech careers

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