With technology, you cannot escape from your Nigerian parents

by | Feb 3, 2017

For many young people who were born into the era of modern technology, using high-tech gadgets comes easy compared to our parents who were born decades ago. Before the proliferation of the internet, modern gadgets and other digital solutions, our parents stayed on top of things. They knew how everything worked and we looked up to them for guidance.

Then technology came and everything changed. Digital solutions replaced the analogue ways our parents were used to, leaving them clueless. Initially, most Nigerian parents refused to embrace the change, but they soon realised that digitisation has come to stay. However,  they hopped on the train and their unending questions are quite annoying. We love our parents but sometimes we wish they would just stick with their “Nokia torchlight” phones but oh well.

They never know how their phones work

Some Nigerian parents buy smartphones and they are never able to figure out how it works. I remember an aunt being worried her phone had developed a fault because an icon, which turned out to be the Bluetooth icon, would not go away.

The only time a Nigerian parent displays any form of humility is when you’re showing them how to use technology. You can send them on errands and they would gladly go.

Advertisement

When they think you’re a technology expert because you can “remove Bluetooth icon”

Since you’re now a technology expert, you’d be called upon to do tedious tasks like removing the phone from a silent mode and checking why their WhatsApp is not agreeing with them. And before they completely ruin your plans for the day, you’ll say “please sir, I didn’t come up with a program that can end world poverty, it’s just a WiFi icon and I can show you how to remove it.”

When they discover Facebook

Before our parents discovered Facebook, you must have been hearing things like “you are always on Facebook but you’ve refused to face your books”. Then they join out of curiosity or to monitor their kids and discover how fun Facebook is and never leave. They’ll try to meddle in your social life (as if they don’t do enough of that offline).

Many young people have refused to accept their parents’ friend requests on Facebook, many have blocked them while much more have simply abandoned the network because their parents joined. For those that accept their friend requests, they would get many likes and comments (both online and offline) on their posts.

And WhatsApp or Wassapp or is it whazup?

I doubt if we would ever figure out why “WhatsApp” is so difficult for Nigerian parents to pronounce properly. What is whazup?

You can run away from Facebook but there’ll be no escaping African parents on WhatsApp. They would bombard you with broadcast messages, videos and “funny” pictures.

They will even do you a favour and ask you to change your profile picture because it “looks somehow”.

For some, figuring out how to use WhatsApp is a problem and they call you every time to attend to one problem or the other, even though you live in a different city.

https://twitter.com/MrAyeni_/status/712011153606631424

When their curiosity leads them to Instagram

I’m not sure I understand what Nigerian parents do on Instagram; they post weird pictures with the weirdest captions. They follow hundreds of people, while they have less than 20 followers (which comprises mostly of younger members of the extended family).

If you think you’ve gotten away with running from them on Facebook and WhatsApp, Instagram is where they catch up with you. You would get tagged in every video and picture they find funny and they would remind you constantly to go check them.

Now that our parents have discovered the many benefits of the internet, they become inseparable from their phones. Some cancel their daily newspaper subscriptions and read news online. This is actually a good thing because it shows that our parents are advancing. Gone are the days when they blamed over pressing our phones for every mistake we made, now, they press their phones even more.

Titilola Oludimu
Titilola Oludimu

I’m always open to new experiences.


Are you in tech and you are looking at getting a foreign remote job or you want to move abroad? Fill this form and you will get the BEST resources to help you get that high paying remote job as well as japa easily! WAGMI!

Subscribe
Notify of
guest
0 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments

Recent News

TABS is tomorrow! 💃 💃

TABS is tomorrow! 💃 💃

On #TechpointDigest, we discuss Victory Farms’ $5m investment, Netflix for kids and people with disabilities, and TikTok’s plan to credit creators.

TikTok on a “Branded Mission”

TikTok on a “Branded Mission”

On #TechpointDigest, we discuss Autochek’s new acquisition, TikTok’s Branded Mission, Bamba’s $3.2 million seed, and Jumia’s report for Q1 2022.

[PODCAST] Tax evasion in Nigeria to get harder

[PODCAST] Tax evasion in Nigeria to get harder

Using data mining and machine learning, Nigeria’s Federal Inland Revenue Service plans to make it harder to evade taxes. Listen to today’s episode of #TechpointAfricaPodcast to learn how it plans to do that.

Subscribe to Techpoint Digest!

A daily 5-minute roundup of happenings in African and global tech, sent directly to your email inbox, between 5 a.m. and 7 a.m (WAT) every week day!

Please check your email to confirm your subscription.

Subscribe to Blockchain Explorer

Analysis oninnovation, regulations, and trends inthe blockchain sector, as it concerns Africa

Please check your email to confirm your subscription.

Subscribe to The Experts

A bi-weekly where tech career specialists take us on their journey from newbie to expert, and how they became successful in the industry.

Please check your email to confirm your subscription.

Subscribe to Founder's Table

A monthly series, where we catch up with founders in the startup ecosystem, learn about their failures, successes and a few tricks of the trade

Please check your email to confirm your subscription.

Copy link
Powered by Social Snap